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Come join these authors, editors, and artists for a drink and discussion about anything under the sun or beyond the stars. Check out the pocket program in your registration package to see who will be doing what, and when. However, before grabbing your cuppa coffee or buying your beer and joining the group, be sure to sign up early for your preferred session to avoid losing your seat at the table!

This is your chance to ask that burning question about the new novel. Hear some interesting stories about the struggles of being a writer or making your first sale. You might even meet a new friend, discover some new books for your “to read” list, or compare notes during a critical discussion about a literary theory. These small group discussions are rewarding opportunities to get to know your favorite writer better.

Sláinte (Cheers),
Erin

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Listed below are the dates, times and writers/artists who have made themselves available to chat with you.

Note: These dates and times are “almost” final. Times, participants and places are subject to change. Please be sure to check the final conference schedule once it is posted. Please remember that attending these sessions requires advance sign-up.

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KAFFEEKLATSCH SCHEDULE (almost final)

Saturday

  • 10am [Galleria]: Greer Gilman, Jo Walton
  • 11am [Galleria]: Jeanne M. Cavelos
  • 12noon [Galleria]: Esther Friesner, Christopher Golden
  • 1pm [Galleria]: Peter V. Brett, David Anthony Durham
  • 2pm [Galleria]: Margaret Ronald, Melinda Snodgrass
  • 3pm [Galleria]: Neil Clarke, Beth Meacham
  • 4pm [Galleria]: Laird Barron, Sarah Langan, Paul G. Tremblay

Sunday

  • 5pm [Galleria]: Charlaine Harris, Toni L. P. Kelner
  • 10am [Galleria]: Joan Slonczewski
  • 11am [Galleria]: Bruce Coville, Jane Yolen
  • 12noon [Galleria]: Michael F. Flynn
  • 1pm [Galleria]: Charles Stross
  • 2pm [Galleria]: Walter H. Hunt, Alexander Jablokov

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LITERARY & ARTISTIC BEERS SCHEDULE (almost final)

Saturday

  • 12noon [Bar]: Ginjer Buchanan, John R. Douglas
  • 1pm [Bar]: Karl Schroeder
  • 2pm [Bar]: Michael F. Flynn, James Patrick Kelly
  • 3pm [Bar]: Michael Swanwick
  • 4pm [Bar]: Jeffrey A. Carver
  • 5pm [Bar]: Debra Doyle, James D. Macdonald

Sunday

  • 12noon [Bar]: Jean-Pierre Normand, Omar Rayyan
  • 1pm [Bar]: Irene Gallo, Greg Manchess
  • 2pm [Bar]: Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Teresa Nielsen Hayden
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Charlaine Harris (photo © Caroline Grayshock)

Boskone 48 is almost here! Soon writers and fans of all ages and stages will be coming together to share their experiences, to attend some great panels, and to meet some of their favorite writers. One of those writers is the talented Charlaine Harris, New York Times Bestselling author of the Sookie Stackhouse Series, which are the inspiration behind HBO’s hit television series True Blood.

Whether you are a young adult or a not-so-young adult, you’re sure to enjoy meeting Charlaine and hearing about her experiences as well as her thoughts on reading, writing, and books. Boskone 48 is only a month away, and the anticipation for Charlaine’s visit is palpable. So, we thought you might enjoy a fangtastic pre-con interview with our special guest, Charlaine Harris.

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Erin:  Other than being told to write write, write, new writers are often encouraged to attend conferences such as Boskone. What experiences and benefits did you get from attending conferences when you were a new writer? How have those experiences and benefits changed as you solidified your status as a New York Times Bestselling author?

Charlaine: I had never met another writer when I attended my first conference, Malice Domestic in Washington . It was invaluable to me to meet other writers, to meet people who’d actually read my books, to talk to booksellers who sold my books. It really changed my life and career. Being a writer is a solitary profession, and before email, it was even more solitary. So exchanging stories and ideas with other people who do the same thing you do can be wonderful. We all have a struggle in common.

Erin: What do you love most about being a writer? What inspires you to keep writing new fiction?

Charlaine: Well, I like to get paid, of course. Other than that mundane consideration, I think I have the greatest job in the world. I love to meet other writers I’ve read, and get to know them as a peer. That’s so cool. And I love being God in my own head. I get to create worlds and kill people and not get arrested for it. There’s something sort of childlike about it, and something very adult, too.

Erin: How do you think Sookie and her friends would react to being invited to Boskone in the middle of winter and featured as topics of choice for discussion panels?

Charlaine: Sookie would be embarrassed and disconcerted, but she’d put her chin up and carry through. Eric and Pam, of course, are used to being the center of attention and it would be quite a matter of course for them. The fae would eat it up. Sam would go back to the bar. Jason would enjoy it way too much.

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Special thank to Charlaine for doing this interview during the height of her deadline season. If you would like a preview of her novel DEAD RECKONING, you can find the first chapter posted on her web site.

Charlaine Harris and the Boskone 48 staff look forward to seeing you in February. Don’t forget to register while the pre-registration prices are still available!

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CHARLAINE HARRIS has been a published novelist for over twenty-five years. A native of the Mississippi Delta, she grew up in the middle of a cotton field. Now she lives in southern Arkansas with her husband, her three children, three dogs, and a duck. The duck stays outside.

Though her early output consisted largely of ghost stories, by the time she hit college (Rhodes, in Memphis) Charlaine was writing poetry and plays. After holding down some low-level jobs, she had the opportunity to stay home and write, and the resulting two stand-alones were published by Houghton Mifflin. After a child-producing sabbatical, Charlaine latched on to the trend of writing mystery series, and soon had her own traditional books about a Georgia librarian, Aurora Teagarden. Her first Teagarden, REAL MURDERS, garnered an Agatha nomination.
Soon Charlaine was looking for another challenge, and the result was the much darker Lily Bard series. The books, set in Shakespeare, Arkansas, feature a heroine who has survived a terrible attack and is learning to live with its consequences.
When Charlaine began to realize that neither of those series was ever going to set the literary world on fire, she regrouped and decided to write the book she’d always wanted to write. Not a traditional mystery, nor yet pure science fiction or romance, DEAD UNTIL DARK broke genre boundaries to appeal to a wide audience of people who just enjoy a good adventure. Each subsequent book about Sookie Stackhouse, telepathic Louisiana barmaid and friend to vampires, werewolves, and various other odd creatures, has drawn more readers. The southern vampire books are published in Japan, Great Britain, Greece, Germany, Thailand, Spain, France, and Russia.
In addition to Sookie, Charlaine has another heroine with a strange ability. Harper Connelly, lightning-struck and strange, can find corpses . . . and that’s how she makes her living.
In addition to her work as a writer, Charlaine is the past senior warden of St. James Episcopal Church, a board member of Mystery Writers of America, a past board member of Sisters in Crime, a member of the American Crime Writers League, and past president of the Arkansas Mystery Writers Alliance. She spends her “spare” time reading, watching her daughter play sports, traveling, and going to the movies.
Biography from Charlaine Harris’s web site.

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